Course Descriptions

  • RSPY 501 - Introduction to Psychotherapy (2)

    An introduction to the theory and techniques of psychotherapy. Includes an emphasis on the relationship between models of psychopathology and psychotherapy, an overview of various approaches to psychotherapy, and a discussion of foundational therapeutic techniques. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSPY 502 - Advanced Statistics (3)

    Concepts and techniques involved in the analysis and interpretation of clinical and research data. Lecture and laboratory descriptive and inferential statistics. Major topics include correlation and regression, test of significance and introduction to analysis of variance. Both parametric and non-parametric approaches are covered. Instruction assumes undergraduate background in statistics. Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSPY 515 - Introduction to Psychopathology (3)

    This course provides a comprehensive study of the current Diagnostic and Statistics Manual of Mental Disorder (DSM). This includes training in diagnosis, and the various psychopathological processes covered in the DSM, as well as honing diagnostic ability and familiarizing students with a range of psychopathology. Required for Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSPY 530 - History and Systems of Psychology (3)

    An overview of the history of psychology and classical systems in psychology. The class also considers issues in the philosophy of science relevant to psychological systems, research, theory, and practice. Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSPY 600 - Research Apprenticeship I, II (3-1)

    Supervised experience in planning, conducting and reporting psychological research. The specific nature of the research project will be determined by the student with his or her advisor. Students will be required to submit a written review of literature and research proposal, conduct data gathering activities, analyze the data and submit a final report of the project in APA format to his/her advisor. The required total of 4 units must be completed by the beginning of the first semester of the third year ins the program.

  • RSPY 601 - Research Design (3)

    Covers the design and analysis of experimental and non-experimental research. Basic principles of sampling, measurement, design validity, analysis, and research ethics are presented. Designs using multivariate approaches are also discussed. Definition and examples of qualitative research models are also presented. The role of research in clinical psychology and in the integration of psychology and theology are explored. A one-unit lab component is required for Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: SPY 502. Required for Psy.D., Ph.D.SPY 603 or 604. Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSPY 601L - Research Design Lab (1)

    This lab is a complement to SPY 601 for PhD students. It focuses on the development of a specific research project in conjunction with the study of Research Design. Prerequisite: SPY 502. Required for Ph.D. students only. Co-registration in SPY 601 is required.

  • RSPY 603 - Learning, Cognition and Affect (3)

    Survey of empirically derived psychological principles as they relate to learning, cognitive and affective processes. Theory and research on operant and respondent conditioning, modeling, cognitive theories, and affective processes are discussed. The relationship of these principles to contemporary cognitive and behavior therapies are examined. Students may choose either this course, SPY 602 or 604. Required for Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSPY 605 - Psychology of Religion (2 or 3)

    A survey of the psychology of religion research emphasizing both content and methodological issues. Topics covered include religiosity and mental health, measures of religiosity, religious development, correlates of religiosity and psychological aspects of conversion and other religious experiences. Elective. (Same as STP 705)

  • RSPY 606 - Developmental Psychology (3)

    Concepts and processes involved in the understanding of the psychological development of the person throughout the lifespan. Major theoretical systems relevant to Developmental Psychology are examined with emphasis upon the study of cognitive, affective and psychomotor changes manifested in childhood and adolescence. Elective.

  • RSPY 607 - Psychophysiological Processes (3)

    An introduction to biological/neurological mechanisms and their relationship to psychological processes. Physiological processes underlying both healthy and pathological behavior are examined. Either this course or SPY 670 or 705 is required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSPY 608 - Social Psychology (3)

    Problems and theories of the person in the social context, including person perception, interpersonal relations, role formation and differentiation, attitude formation, maintenance and change. Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSPY 610 - Development of Religious Understanding in Children and Adolescents (2)

    An assessment of the cognitive and affective meaning that children and adolescents attribute to religious concepts, practices and experiences, and their changes in meaning during the course of individual development. The biblical perspective of religious development is also examined. Elective.

  • RSPY 615 - Advanced Developmental Psychology (4)

    Concepts and processes involved in the development of the person throughout the lifespan are reviewed with emphasis on cultural variations. Major theoretical systems relevant to individual development are examined with emphasis upon the study of neurobiological, cognitive, affective, and psychomotor changes manifested in childhood and adolescence. Various theories on the development of psychopathology are addressed, with a focus on psychodynamic theorists including Freud, Adler, Jung, Klein, Winnicott, Fairbairn, Kohut, and Stolorow. Prerequisite: A survey course (graduate or undergraduate in developmental psychology, and RSPY 515. Required of Psy.D. and Ph.D.

  • RSPY 625 - Cross-cultural Issues in Clinical Psychology (2-3)

    A consideration of the impact of social and cultural factors upon the utilization and dynamics of mental health services. Focuses on developing the student’s sensitivity to the cultural dynamics involved in the therapeutic process. Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSPY 630 - Psychology of Women (3)

    A discussion of historical and contemporary views of women and a look at research on biological and psychological differences between males and females. Also includes discussion of psychotherapeutic issues, the role of women in the church, and theological perspectives on women’s issues. Elective.

  • RSPY 631 - Principles of Health Psychology (2-3)

    This course provides an overview of theory, research and roles of psychologists in the dissemination of psychological knowledge into the health care system. Areas of focus include concerns of the family physician for which referral might be made, adjustment to physical disabilities, coping with chronic illness, stages of adjustment by individuals and their families to death and dying, preventive-educative and motivational issues in medical treatment. Prerequisites: SPY 607, SLB 706, and /or SLB 707 recommended. Elective.

  • RSPY 632 - Research Problems in Psychotherapy (2)

    Consideration of research approaches to studying the process and outcomes of psychotherapy. Special emphasis is placed on measurement of process and outcomes, design and execution of research and status of psychotherapy research to date. Students are actively involved in reviewing and evaluating psychotherapy research in selected areas. Prerequisite: SPY 601. Elective.

  • RSPY 633 - Advanced Seminar in Psychopathology (3)

    A survey of the development, dynamics and classification of the psychological disorders from a psychoanalytic point of view. Special attentions given to the neuroses and the operations of ego defense mechanisms. Elective.

  • RSPY 641 - Measurement and Assessment I: Intellect (3)

    The first in a sequence of courses directed toward competence in administration, scoring and interpretation of psychological tests. The course involves a survey of basic concepts and principles of psychological measurement, including factors influencing validity and reliability. Emphasis is placed on the Child and Adult Intelligence scales as well as measures of achievement, adjustment, and adaptive behavior. Graduate student will administer test batteries to school and clinic populations and also engage in diagnostic and report writing activities. Graduate students will also learn diagnostic criteria for handicapped children as well as their legal rights as set forth by Public Law 94-142. Cost of materials required is approximately $150. Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSPY 642 - Measurement and Assessment II: Personality (3)

    Use of objective personality instruments with emphasis upon the MMPI-II and MCMI-II. Introduction to more structured projective instruments such as the TAT and Sentence Completion. Prerequisite: SPY 641. Cost of materials required for this course is approximately $150. Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSPY 643 - Measurement and Assessment III: Projectives (Rorshach) (3)

    An introduction to the use of projective techniques in personality assessment with special emphasis on the administration, scoring and interpretation of the Rorshach using Exner's comprehensive System. Prerequisite: SPY 642. Required of Psy.D.

  • RSPY 644 - Measurement and Assessment IV: Advanced Projectives (Special Issues) (2)

    Advanced interpretation of the Rorshach including special issues as forensic evaluations, child and adolescent personality assessment, assessment of thought disorder. Other basic projective instruments such as the TAT, CAT and Sentence Completion tests are also covered. Prerequisite: SPY 643. Elective.

  • RSPY 645 - Measurement and Assessment V: Neuropsychological (3)

    This course provides an overview of the basic issues in neuropsychology, and examines the key cognitive-psychological ability areas that are assessed in a neuropsychological evaluation. Assessment from a flexible, hypothesis-testing and clinical perspective is emphasized. Special attention will be given to brief neuropsychological screening procedures which help to differentiate between organic and psychological disorders. Prerequisite SPY 607, 670 or 705. Elective.

  • RSPY 647 - Advanced Assessment of Individuals With Disabilities (3)

    An advanced diagnostic course which focuses on the assessment and diagnosis of exceptional children as well as legal and advocacy issues required by the Individuals with Disabilities Act. Specific diagnostic populations include mentally retarded, learning disabled, emotionally disturbed and gifted children. Attention is also given to low incidence handicaps such as vision impaired, hearing impaired, multiple handicapped, etc. Prerequisites: SPY 641, and permission of instructor.

  • RSPY 650 - Family Psychology and Psychopathology (3)

    Emphasizes the construction of a conceptual framework for system change as a foundation for clinical intervention. Surveys major approaches to systems-oriented family therapy and includes such related issues as the family life cycle, object relations integration, family pathology/dysfunction, family assessment, ethnicity and religious influences. Elective.

  • RSPY 651 - Seminar in Psychodynamic Theory I (2)

    An in-depth study of the process of therapy based on psychoanalytic developmental theory and giving special attention to the concepts of transference, counter-transference and interpretation. This course is only available with the initiative and approval of the instructor when an appropriate client is unavailable to the student for lab requirements.

  • RSPY 652 - Seminar in Psychodynamic Theory II (1)

    Continuation of RSLB 651. This course is only available with the initiative and approval of the instructor when an appropriate client is unavailable to the student for lab requirements.

  • RSPY 663 - Human Sexuality (2)

    An examination of the areas of human sexual functioning, behavior, relationships and feelings. Issues of sexuality are discussed within spiritual, psychological, cultural and medical/ health perspectives with implications for clinical treatment of sexual issues. Elective.

  • RSPY 680 - Prepracticum (3)

    A condensed version of Prepracticum I & II for students with significant previous graduate study in psychology. This course is designed to facilitate the development of empathic listening, interpersonal skills and basic therapeutic techniques through group interaction and closely supervised on-campus practicum experiences. Required of advanced first year students to be taken concurrently with STP 500 Psychotherapy and Religion. Fall. Fee: $55.

  • RSPY 681- Prepracticum I (1)

    The first of a two-course sequence designed to facilitate the development of empathic listening, interpersonal skills and basic therapeutic techniques including an introduction to ethics. This first course emphasizes a small, interactive group format for the development of skills. Interterm. Fee: $55.

  • RSPY 682 - Prepracticum II (2)

    The second of a two-course sequence designed to facilitate the development of empathic listening, interpersonal skills and basic therapeutic techniques. During this course, direct observation and videotaping of the student’s first clinical practicum in the University’s counseling center are utilized to provide a closely supervised introduction to the therapeutic process. Spring. Requirement: To be taken concurrently with STP 500. Prerequisite: SPY 681.

  • RSPY 688 - Practicum Supervision (0)

    Small group supervision coordinated by director of clinical training. This course is taken concurrently with all practica (SPY 689, 691-699). Required of Ph.D., Psy.D. SPY 689 Practicum Continuous Enrollment (0) Students continuing a fall or spring practicum through Interterm or summer will register for this 0-unit course. Registration in a fall or spring practicum and SPY 688 is required. Prerequisite: SPY 691 and permission of the director of clinical training.

  • RSPY 691-696 - Practicum I-VI (1-3)

    Supervised clinical experiences including diagnostic and therapeutic activities with inpatient and outpatient clientele. Hospitals, private and public clinics, mental health organizations, schools and college counseling centers are utilized. Prerequisite: successful completion of SPY 680, or approval of the Clinical Training Committee. Co-registration in SPY 688 required. Required for Ph.D. and Psy.D.

  • RSPY 697-699 - Practicum Elective (1-3)

    For students desiring supervised clinical experiences beyond the requirements for their degree. These are used as elective practica. Prerequisite: approval of the director of clinical training. Co-registration in SPY 688 required.

  • RSPY 700 - Clinical Case Conference (1)

    Small group supervision of ongoing psychological cases. Elective.

  • RSPY 701 - College Teaching of Psychology (2)

    A seminar on teaching methods including the development of course objectives, outlines, lectures and evaluations. Major emphasis is placed on the examination of the various teaching methods available to the teacher of psychology. Elective.

  • RSPY 704 - Advanced Research Design (3)

    A continuation of SPY 601 for Ph.D. students. Major emphasis is given to multiple regression analysis, including validity of assumptions, diagnostics, outliers, transformation of variables, and categorical dependent variables. Introduction is given to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, and structural equation models. Computer implementation and applications are emphasized. Prerequisite: SPY 601. Required for Ph.D. only.

  • RSPY 705 - Clinical Psychopharmacology (3)

    A general overview of current research on the use and effectiveness of psychotropic medication in the treatment of the psychoses, neuroses and other emotional disorders. Consultation and class presentations by area psychiatrists. Prerequisite: SPY 607 or equivalent. Either this course or SPY 607 or 670 is required.

  • RSPY 707 - Fee For Service (1-3)

    This course offers students the option of flourishing in private practice without subsidy from managed care. Students learn to: (a) place a monetary value on their clinical services, (b) examine their own family histories concerning money, and (c) formulate a mission statement about what they’re offering clients in outpatient psychotherapy. Students see live or taped interviews of thriving practitioners who have no participation with managed care. Optional lab provided by instructor, who coaches students with vignettes designed to help student develop competencies as fee-for-service practitioners. Elective.

  • RSPY 708 - Structural Equation Modeling (3)

    Introduction to models and methods for analysis of data hypothesized to be generated by unmeasured latent variables including latent variable analogues of traditional methods in multivariate analysis. Emphasis is given to measurement models such as confirmatory and higher-order factor analytic models and structural equation models, including path and simultaneous equation models. Parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, and other statistical issues are covered. Computer implementation and applications. Elective. Prerequisite: SPY 704.

  • RSPY 709 - Current Issues in Psychology (1-3)

    Intensive focus is given to a selected topic of contemporary interest such as grief therapy, forensic psychology, National Health Care and Psychological service. Elective.

  • RSPY 710 - Special Techniques in Clinical Practice (1-3)

    Intensive consideration of a specific technique utilized in modern clinical practice and requiring specialized training. A single major technique, for example the Halstead-Reitan Adult Neuropsychological Battery, clinical hypnosis, or multi-generational therapy will be the focus each time this course is offered. Elective.

  • RSPY 711 - Seminar in Ethical and Professional Issues (3)

    A study and discussion of the ethics of professional psychology with an emphasis on the American Psychological Association’s Code of Ethics, guidelines, and laws that govern the profession. Preparation for the oral and written portions of the licensing exam in the state of California is also given emphasis. The challenge to integrate a professional, Christian, and personal ethical code is discussed. Required of Psy.D, Ph.D.

  • RSPY 712 - Independent Study (1-3)

    Individual work, directed reading or special problems in psychology. Such work must be done with the approval and supervision of a faculty professor of record. The student is expected to submit a detailed course proposal and a bibliography with an arranged course permission form available from the Registrar’s Office. Required courses may not be taken through independent study. Elective.

  • RSPY 713 - Clinical Supervision and Consultation (1-3)

    A course designed to give students training and practice in supervisory and consultation roles. Mutual supervision and case presentations are used to develop skills. This course or SLB 702 is required of Ph.D. and Psy.D. Prerequisite: SPY 691-692.

  • RSPY 715 Training Therapy (Group) (0)

    For official indication on the student’s transcript of required personal growth experience through group training therapy. Required of all doctoral students.

  • RSPY 716 - Training Therapy (Individual) (0)

    For official indication on the student’s transcript of required personal growth experience through an individual training therapy. Required of all doctoral students.

  • RSPY 722 - Advanced Topics in Quantitative Methods (1-3)

    Intensive focus is given to a particular quantitative methodology such as Structural Equation Modeling, Hierarchical Linear Models, and Growth Curve Analysis. Prerequisite: SPY 704. Instructor’s signature required. Elective.

  • RSPY 729 - Alcohol & Substance Abuse (1-2)

    Diagnosis, treatment planning, and recovery process for the alcoholic/ addict and family members will be the focus of the class. The disease model of addictions treatment and the utilization of 12-step support groups in the treatment of the recovering person and the family members will be presented. Other compulsive diseases will be discussed such as sexual addiction, eating disorders, etc. Class lecture, special speakers, and assigned reading will be the primary methods of instruction.

  • RSPY 730 - Directed Research (1-3)

    Students may take special courses of study and/or pursue research projects that they design and carry out under the guidance of a resident faculty member. Individual or small group participation in a research project in psychology must be under the supervision of a faculty member. The student must submit an arranged course permission form giving a detailed outline of the research and other learning experiences of the course. Required courses may not be taken through Directed Research. Approval of faculty advisor and academic dean is required. Elective.

  • RSPY 733 - The Self: Theological, Philosophical, Psychological and Crosscultural Perspectives (3)

    This course looks at philosophical, theological, psychological, and crosscultural views of the nature of the self. The course explores some of the biblical and philosophical terminology. It also explores the historical emphasis on the self, with a focus on its current emphasis in psychoanalytic psychology, and its developmental aspect, and a psychological view of the true and false self. The western culture perspective on the self is compared with other cultures. Finally, a religious perspective on the true and false self is presented. Elective.

  • RSDS 718 - Doctoral Research Seminar I (3)

    This is the first of a two course sequence which Psy.D. non-dissertation students can take as a partial fulfillment of their doctoral research competency. This course includes an in-depth study of research methods in clinical psychology and experience in critically reviewing current clinical research.

  • RSDS 719 Doctoral Research -Seminar II (2)

    Building on SPY 718, this course involves writing an in-depth critical review of the research literature on a selected topic in clinical psychology. Prerequisite: SDS 718.

  • RSDS 721 - Dissertation Research (1-10)

    Planning and implementation of a research project including literature review, problem definition, hypothesis formation, design, and implementation of field research, data analysis, and report writing. The student’s dissertation research is supervised by a faculty chair and committee. The final stage requires the student to successfully sustain an Oral Defense of the dissertation. Required of Ph.D. Permission of instructor.

  • RSTN 731 - Internship in Clinical Psychology (0)

    Professional experience of a one year internship in a facility approved by the Professional Training Committee. Prerequisites: Successful completion of comprehensive examinations, course requirements, professional qualifying examination, and approval of a dissertation proposal. STN 731 or STN 732 is required. Internship fee: $1,200 per semester.

  • RSTN 732 - Half-Time Internship (0)

    Professional experience of a two-year internship in a facility approved by the Professional Training Committee. Prerequisites: Successful completion of comprehensive examinations, course requirements, professional qualifying examination, and an approval of a dissertation proposal. STN 731 or STN 732 is required. Internship fee: $600 per semester. By permission of Director of Clinical Training.

Psychotherapy Laboratory

This series of elective courses is designed to effect a working integration of conceptual and experimental aspects of psychotherapy. Ph.D. students are required to take 12 units of SLB courses and Psy.D. students, 21 units. Each course includes both course work and supervised clinical experience within the psychotherapy model followed in the specific course. Completion of SPY 501, 515 and 680 or 681 and 682 or their equivalent is required before enrollment in these courses is permitted. All SLB courses have limited enrollments and require permission of the instructor. Students need to have access to appropriate client pools through their practica unless clients are obtained through the SLB course.

  • RSLB 613 - Introduction to Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy (3)

    An introduction to the basics of therapy with children and adolescents. The course will emphasize a survey of developmentally appropriate individual and systemic therapeutic approaches. Secondary supervision is provided in the required lab component. Elective.

  • RSLB 631 - Psychodynamic Therapy I (2)

    An in-depth study of the process of therapy based on psychoanalytic developmental theory and giving special attention to the concepts of transference, counter-transference and interpretation. A lab group is included for both 631 and 632. Prerequisite: SPY 515, participation in individual training therapy and permission of instructor. Enrollment must be planned for both SLB 631 and 632. Elective.

  • RSLB 631 - Psychodynamic Therapy Lab I (1)

    A lab group is included for both 631 and 632. Prerequisite: SPY 515, participation in individual training therapy and permission of instructor. Enrollment must be planned for both SLB 631 and 632. Elective.

  • RSLB 632L - Psychodynamic Therapy II (1)

    Continuation of SLB 631. Prerequisites: SLB 631 and permission of the instructor. Elective

  • RSLB 632L - Psychodynamic Therapy Lab II (2)

    A lab group is included for both SLB 631 and 632. Prerequisite: SLB 631. Elective.

  • RSLB 641 - Psychotherapy with Groups (3)

    The essentials of the group psychotherapy process are examined and related to current modalities in psychotherapy and general group phenomena. Elective.

  • RSLB 642 - Advanced Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy (3)

    A continuation of SLB 613, this course offers advanced training in therapeutic techniques with children and adolescents. In particular, dynamic and systemic orientations will be emphasized. Special focus will be given to techniques of play therapy. Secondary supervision is provided in the required lab component. Prerequisite: SLB 613 - Elective.

  • RSLB 643 - Cognitive/Behavioral Therapy with Children (3)

    This course emphasizes the treatment of children and families from a behavioral perspective including operant, respondent, cognitive and social learning theory models. Graduate students must carry at least three clients during the course of the semester and will be afforded the opportunity to conduct parent workshops in lieu of one client. Prerequisites: SPY 603.

  • RSLB 671- Marriage and Family Therapy I (3)

    A study of the literature and practice of marital and family therapy. The course provides an overview of various approaches to family therapy with a special emphasis on the structural family therapy model. Application of clinical techniques is accomplished through observation, simulations, and at least one marital or family case using a team model of intervention supervision in the school clinic. Prerequisites: SPY 650.

  • RSLB 672 - Marriage and Family Therapy II (3)

    Continuation of SLB 671. Major consideration is given to experiential and psychodynamic perspectives on intervention within a structural framework. Application of clinical techniques is continued from the first semester using observation, simulation, and therapy experience with supervision. Prerequisites: SLB 671.

  • RSLB 676 - Psychotherapy With Couples (3)

    Study of theory and practice of conjoint therapy with couples. A number of theoretical perspectives and related clinical techniques will be studied including cognitive-behavioral, emotionally focused, ego-analytic, and psychodynamic approaches. The intervention techniques can be applied with pre-marital couples, for couple enrichment and as part of psychotherapy with distressed couples. Students will see a couple throughout the semester. Elective.

  • RSLB 681 - Special Issues in Psychodynamic Therapy I (2-3)

    An advanced course in psychodynamic psychotherapy dealing with issues such as impairments of the therapeutic relationship, acting out, levels and timing of interpretations and psychotherapy with individuals suffering from disturbances in early object relationships. Prerequisite: SLB 632; permission of instructor. Elective.

  • RSLB 702 - Principles and Practices in Case Supervision I (1-3)

    A seminar in case supervision. Students are responsible for supervising the professional experiences of less advanced students. Prerequisites: admission to doctoral studies. This course or SPY 713 is required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSLB 703 - Principles and Practices in Case Supervision II (1-3)

    Continuation of SLB 702. Prerequisites: SLB 702 and permission of instructor. Elective.

  • RSLB 705 - Brief Psychotherapies (3)

    Models and approaches in brief interventions with special attention to crisis intervention. Theorists include Mann, Sifneos, Malan and Davanloo. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Elective.

  • RSLB 706 - Clinical Biofeedback (3)

    This course is an introduction to concepts and techniques of biofeedback as applied to stress management, anxiety disorders, psychosomatic symptoms, and other psychological problems. Formal registration for credit is usually in the spring semester, but actual learning experiences begin in the fall semester to allow ample time for mastering the technical equipment necessary for use with clients. Students receive 10 hours of personal biofeedback. Course size is limited and requires the advance permission of the instructor.

  • RSLB 707 - Cognitive Behavior Therapy (3)

    This course will present a cognitive behavioral model of treatment for depression, anxiety, and the personality disorders. The theories of Aaron T. Beck, Donald Meichenbaum and Christine Padesky will be considered. Students will learn how to apply this approach with individuals and with couples. Prerequisite: SPY 603; permission of instructor. Elective.

  • RSLB 710 - Existential Psychotherapy (3)

    Study and practice of the therapeutic relationship and the process of therapy from a growth or actualization perspective, including the approaches of selected theorists such as Rogers, Gendlin, and selected existential therapists. Prerequisites: SPY 515; permission of instructor. Elective.

  • RSLB 715 - Current Psychotherapies (3)

    This course focuses each time it is offered on a specific therapy not regularly included in Rosemead’s curriculum. Teaching personnel are drawn from the professional community of active practitioners of the specific modality to be considered. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Elective.

  • RSLB 717 - Gestalt Psychotherapy (3)

    The focus of this course will present the theory and application of Gestalt therapy for use with individuals and groups. This therapy, created by Perls and developed by Zinker & Polster, focuses on personal growth and self-actualization. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Elective.

  • RSLB 718 - Advanced Gestalt (3)

    This course is open to students who have completed SLB 717 and focuses on the application of Gestalt therapy and techniques to group psychotherapy. Enrollment is limited and the permission of the instructor is required.

Theology/Biblical Studies

This series of courses provides students with essential biblical and theological understanding prerequisite to effective integration of the disciplines of psychology and theology. (17 units required.)

  • RSTH 521 - Theology I: Revelation, Theology-Integration and the Nature of God (4)

    This course is designed to integrate traditional themes and categories in systematic theology with psychology and spiritual formation. An exploration into the nature, method and rationale of Christian theology interfaced with the practical emphasis on spiritual theology, which has as its end the love of God. Emphasis is given to a study of revelation, both general and special, inspiration, canonicity and illumination of Scripture in the life of growth. Attention will also be given to the nature of theology, spiritual theology and their meta-integration with the manifold creation disciplines (psychology, sciences, arts, humanities etc.). Particular attention given to the doctrine of God, his existence, attributes, Trinitarian nature and knowledge of God in the light of the believer’s deep beliefs of the heart and unconscious theology which may hinder spiritual growth. Attention is also given to biblical interpretation, study, mediation and psychological issues involved in its application to life. Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSTH 522 - Theology II: Works of God, Wisdom, Humankind and Sin (3)

    An investigation into God’s eternal plan including his kingdom purpose and redemptive focus, His work of creation and continued activity with creation, angels both good and evil including their origin, present state, work and destiny. This also involves an in-depth discussion of natural law, integration and the wisdom of God evident in the works of God (OT wisdom literature). Particular emphasis is given to the creation of humans in God’s image, human nature, the fall and effects of sin upon humanity, human life in relation to the divine institutions of the family and civil government as this interfaces Spiritual Theology, integration and the end of loving God. Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSTH 603 - Theology III: Christ, Salvation and the Spirit (4)

    An investigation into the person and saving work of Christ, particularly the nature and application of salvation and their relation to spiritual formation. Attention is given to the person and ministry of the Holy Spirit, particularly as it relates to His indwelling ministry within the psychological dynamics of the human soul. Special emphasis on the practice of sanctification in personal Christian living. Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSTH 604 - Theology IV: The Church and Eschatology (3)

    The study of the broad kingdom purpose of God and the future events related to the destiny of history and individuals including Christ’s coming in its phases, the millennial reign of Christ, the resurrections, the judgments and eternal state. Emphasis will also be given to their relevance to spiritual formation and human guilt, anxiety and repression of these realities. The inception and nature of the church as the new kingdom community, both as a living organism and an organization, its function, ordinances and place and mission in God’s purpose and human happiness. Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSTH 625 - Theology V: Christian Ethics (3)

    An introduction to ethics including the nature of personal character, virtues and vices, and their relationship to the spiritual disciplines as means of spiritual growth into the image of Christ. Attention is given to understanding the personal dynamics involved in good and bad character in light of sin, common grace, religious defenses and the Spirit-infused virtues of faith, hope and love transforming the so called natural virtues. Particular emphasis is given to an introduction to the spiritual disciplines and their role in Christian spiritual formation and the development of virtue. Attention also given to the history of ethics in light of the contemporary mileu and practical ethical issues such as divorce, abortion, homosexuality, euthanasia and the human control of human beings. Required of Psy.D., Ph.D.

  • RSTH 730 - Independent Study (1-3)

    Individual work, directed reading or special problems in theology. Such study must be done with the approval and supervision of a faculty professor of record. The student is expected to submit a detailed course proposal and a bibliography on a learning contract form available from the Registrar’s Office. Required courses may not be taken through independent study. Elective.

Integration of Psychology and Theology

Rosemead’s curriculum is distinguished by a series of seminars designed to investigate the mutual relationships between theological and psychological concepts and data. These seminars constitute an essential part of Rosemead training and offer students an opportunity to become involved in a creative application of shared insights from these related disciplines. Each student must take STP 500 and 721, and additional integration seminars to total 14 units.

  • RSTP 500 - Psychotherapy and Religion (1)

    An introduction to the contributions a biblical understanding of human nature can make to the psychological practitioner’s understanding of the therapeutic process. Special attention is given to the relational dimension of human growth and development. Required of all first year students to be taken concurrently with SPY 680 (Prepracticum).

  • RSTP 705 - Psychology of Religion (2)

    A survey of the psychology of religion research emphasizing both content and methodological issues. Topics covered include religiosity and mental health, measures of religiosity, religious development, correlates of religiosity and psychological aspects of conversion and other religious aspects. Prerequisite: STP500. Elective.

  • RSTP 715 - Contemporary Psychoanalysis and Religion (3)

    The history of the concept of transference is traced, particularly as pertains to controversies in contemporary psychoanalysis over historical truth vs. narrative truth, and reality vs. illusion, with special attention to the formation and use of God as a foreground and background object in light of modern infant observational research. Prerequisite: STP 721. Elective.

  • RSTP 720 - Psychotherapy With Religiously Committed Patients (3)

    This course is a chance to share practical ways of addressing clinical themes, as well as broader conceptual issues like developing a personally meaningful, on-going theology of therapy. Certain themes if handled one way allow therapy with religiously committed patients to take on more depth; if handled in other ways the work assumes a more superficial quality and meets with a kind of therapeutic stalemate, even when therapist and patient are both persons of faith. Elective.

  • RSTP 721 - The Nature and Scope of Integration (3)

    This course includes a discussion of the models, levels and areas in which integration of the theological and psychological can occur, as well as a framework for conceptualizing the scope of integration. Prerequisite: STH 521. Required of Ph.D., Psy.D.

  • RSTP 725 - Psychotherapy and Spirituality (2-3)

    This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of the integral process of growth in psychotherapy and spirituality. Course material focuses on an understanding of the nature of psychological and spiritual growth, and an experimental awareness of that growth process. Prerequisite: STP 721. Elective

  • RSTP 730 - Mental Health Issues for Crosscultural Sojourners (2)

    A study of the contributions psychologists can make to the missionary enterprise including cross-cultural adjustment issues facing sojourners. Additional topics vary from semester to semester but include content such as the selection and evaluation of missionary candidates; pre-field orientation and training; on field training and intervention services to sojourners; coping with transitions; and the unique identity and adjustment issues of Third Culture Kids. Prerequisite: STP 721. Elective.

  • RSTP 735 - Perspectives on the Self (3)

    This covers an overview of philosophic, theological, psychological, cross-cultural and spiritual perspectives on the self. It also considers the historical transition from focusing on the soul to the contemporary focusing on the self. Prerequisite: STP 721. Elective.

  • RSTP 744 - Integration and Therapy (2)

    The focus of this seminar is on “explicit integration” in psychotherapy. The distinctives of the Christian therapist and therapeutic conceptualizations and intervention are examined. (Course may be repeated with different emphasis.) Prerequisite: STP 721; permission of instructor. Elective.

  • RSTP 745 - Maturity: Psychological and Theological Perspectives (2)

    Various approaches to the concept of maturity are reviewed, including the psychological, biblical and devotional. A major focus is placed on the similarities and differences between biblical and psychological maturity as seen by such integration theorists as Carter, Clines, Grounds and Oakland. Prerequisite: STP 721. Elective.

  • RSTP 746 - Selected Topics and Issues in Integration (2-3)

    Occasional seminars are offered under this course designation with focus on some contemporary integration issue, controversy or special research interest. Prerequisite: STP 721. Elective.

  • RSTP 750 - Perspectives on Human Nature (2)

    A critical examination of various theological and psychological anthropologies. Each student is expected to conduct an in-depth review of one theoretical perspective. Prerequisite: STP 721. Elective.

  • RSTP 760 - Independent Study (1-3)

    Individual study, directed reading or special problems in integration. Such study must be done with the approval and supervision of a faculty professor of record. The student is expected to submit a detailed course proposal and a bibliography on a learning contract form available from the Registrar’s Office. Required courses may not be taken through independent study. Elective.

Intercultural Studies

Students can apply up to six units of the following courses toward the psychology graduation requirement. These courses are not substitutes for required Rosemead courses. Course descriptions are given under the School of Intercultural Studies section of the catalog. SCL - 520 Interpersonal and Intercultural Adjustment SCL - 561 Topics in Cultural Anthropology; SCL 563 Gender Roles in International Settings; SCL 622 Intercultural Communication; SCL 702 Social Organization; SCL 725 Cultural Continuity and Change; SCL 747 Christianity and Culture

  • ISCL 520 - Interpersonal & Intercultural Adjustment

  • ISCL 561 - Topics in Cultural Anthropology

  • ISCL 563 - Gender Roles in International Settings

  • ISCL 622 - Intercultural Communication

  • ISCL 702 - Social Organization

  • ISCL 725 - Cultural Continuity & Change

  • ISCL 747 - Christianity & Culture

Biola University
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